Kenya

At a Glance

Kenya’s economy is largely dependent on tourism and rainfed agriculture, both susceptible to climate change and extreme weather events. Increasing heat and recurrent droughts contribute to severe crop and livestock losses, leading to famine, displacement, and other threats to human health and wellbeing. Kenya’s predominantly low-lying coastline and surrounding islands are at risk from sea level rise, with significant implications for the fisheries sector and storm surge protection. Agriculture is the leading source of greenhouse gas emissions in the country, largely driven by enteric fermentation from livestock.

    Climate Projections and Impacts

    Refer to the Climate Risk Profile (2018) for more information. 

    Climate Projections

    Drought icon

    Increased Incidence of Dry Spells/Droughts & Increased Heat Wave Duration

    Increased/More Frequent Precipitation

    Sea Level Rise

    Increased Temperature

    Key Climate Impact Areas

    Agriculture

    Ecosystems

    Energy & Infrastructure

    Human Health

    Water

    Funding and Key Indicators


    USAID Climate Change Funding (2020)

    Total

    $1 Million

    Adaptation

    $1 Million

    GAIN Vulnerability

    Medium

    Population (2020)

    53.5 Million

    GHG Emissions Growth

    5.63%

    % Forested Area

    7.8%

    Climate Change Information

    Kenya Photo Gallery

    Stories from the Area

    The agriculture sector across the globe not only feeds the world’s population but it also provides nearly 27 percent of worldwide employment. Yet the sector faces significant sustainability challenges: it is estimated to contribute more than one-fifth of global greenhouse gas emissions through a combination of agricultural activities and land use changes, and it consumes, on average, 70 percent of the world’s freshwater resources.
    For decades, we’ve partnered with communities to strengthen resource rights and conserve forests and wildlife
    In the dairy sector, low-emissions development (LED) often utilizes intensification practices that reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and increase yield. However, LED focuses on technical practices and outcomes, seldom considering the subsequent impacts on women’s and men's social distribution of burdens and benefits.