Image of colorful boats tied to a dock on a still body of water.

Suriname

At a Glance

The Eastern and Southern Caribbean Regional Program serves Antigua & Barbuda, Barbados, Dominica, Grenada, Guyana, Trinidad & Tobago, Saint Lucia, Saint Kitts & Nevis, Saint Vincent & the Grenadines, and Suriname.

The geography of the Caribbean makes it vulnerable to Atlantic hurricanes and tropical storms, whose intensity is projected to increase with climate change. Small island communities are also susceptible to salt intrusion into freshwater sources making the region highly vulnerable to rising sea level.  USAID’s work in the region aims to raise stakeholder awareness of climate change and facilitate the consideration of climate change in national development planning, the transition to renewable energy, and community preparedness to strengthen the long-term viability of the small island nations in the region.

    Climate Projections and Impacts

    Refer to the Climate Risk Profile (2018) for more information.

    Climate Projections

    Increased Frequency/Intensity of Extreme Weather Events

    Rising Sea Levels and Increased Incidence of Storm Surge

    Increased Temperature

    Key Climate Impact Areas

    Agriculture

    Fisheries

    Coastal Resources

    Human Health

    Livelihoods & Tourism

    Water Resources

    Funding and Key Indicators


    USAID Regional Climate Change Funding (2020)

    Total

    $3 Million

    Adaptation

    $3 Million

    GAIN Vulnerability

    Medium

    Population (2020)

    609,569

    GHG Emissions Growth

    0.78%

    % Forested Area

    98.3%

    Climate Change Information

    Stories from the Area

    According to the recently released Amazon Vision 2020 Report, USAID and its global partners improved the management and conditions of key landscapes in the Amazon, working on more than 48 million hectares.
    The Amazon region is home to 1.6 million Indigenous Peoples, all of whom depend on the region’s forest and water resources for their material and cultural survival. Studies have shown that deforestation rates are much lower in places where Amazonian Indigenous Peoples have strong land tenure rights, making Indigenous Peoples important allies in biodiversity conservation.